Historical

The Hamilton House

  • South Berwick

  • www.historicnewengland.org

  • 40 Vaughan’s Lane
    South Berwick, Maine 03908
    Telephone: 207-384-2454

    Open
    June 1 – October 15: Wednesday–Sunday; 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
    Tours on the hour. Last tour at 4:00 p.m.
    June 1 and 2, free admission
    Closed July 4
    September 28 and 29: first-floor open house only with admission to Fine Arts and Crafts Festival

    Admission: $8 adults; $7 seniors; $4 students
    Free for Historic New England members and South Berwick residents.

    Hamilton House was built after the Revolution by Colonel Jonathan Hamilton, a trader in lumber, rum, and molasses but its style is emphatically pre-Revolutionary and is situated on the bank of the Salmon Falls River in South Berwick. Most of the surviving pre-Revolutionary great houses were connected to the rest of the colonies by water since roads were nonexistent or difficult to traverse at best

    The riverfront of Hamilton House is intended to make a good first impression with its grand, symmetrical front, steep-pitched hip roof, and four separate chimneys on the outside walls. The classical detailing, elegant stairway and elaborate wallpaper of the interior define the elegance of the high style of the times.

    When Jefferson’s trade embargo and the War of 1812 disrupted the New England coastal economy, Hamilton House fell on hard times. It was restored to its current state when novelist Sarah Orne Jewett convinced Emily Tyson of Boston to buy it in the 1890s and it became her summer retreat. Tyson’s daughter, Elise, later bequeathed the house to Historic New England in 1949.
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  • Recommendation

    Historic Maine Homes

    Architectural historian Christopher Glass and renowned architectural photographer Brian Vanden Brink bring their well-honed skills to bear on celebrating historic Maine homes, both public and private.
    Buy
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40 Vaughan’s Lane
South Berwick, Maine 03908
Telephone: 207-384-2454

Open
June 1 – October 15: Wednesday–Sunday; 11:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Tours on the hour. Last tour at 4:00 p.m.
June 1 and 2, free admission
Closed July 4
September 28 and 29: first-floor open house only with admission to Fine Arts and Crafts Festival

Admission: $8 adults; $7 seniors; $4 students
Free for Historic New England members and South Berwick residents.

Hamilton House was built after the Revolution by Colonel Jonathan Hamilton, a trader in lumber, rum, and molasses but its style is emphatically pre-Revolutionary and is situated on the bank of the Salmon Falls River in South Berwick. Most of the surviving pre-Revolutionary great houses were connected to the rest of the colonies by water since roads were nonexistent or difficult to traverse at best

The riverfront of Hamilton House is intended to make a good first impression with its grand, symmetrical front, steep-pitched hip roof, and four separate chimneys on the outside walls. The classical detailing, elegant stairway and elaborate wallpaper of the interior define the elegance of the high style of the times.

When Jefferson’s trade embargo and the War of 1812 disrupted the New England coastal economy, Hamilton House fell on hard times. It was restored to its current state when novelist Sarah Orne Jewett convinced Emily Tyson of Boston to buy it in the 1890s and it became her summer retreat. Tyson’s daughter, Elise, later bequeathed the house to Historic New England in 1949.


 

Recommendation

Historic Maine Homes

Architectural historian Christopher Glass and renowned architectural photographer Brian Vanden Brink bring their well-honed skills to bear on celebrating historic Maine homes, both public and private.

Buy

Back to Historical Back to home